A disappointing vote to limit charter and head boats

Since December, the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council has gotten 246 on the record comments opposing limiting the number of charter and head boats and just 5 comments in favor.

Yet last week the SAFMC voted 9 to 3 to move forward with limiting the number of charter and head boats in the snapper-grouper fishery. This despite the overwhelming opposition and no scientific justification: there has been a 40 percent plunge in for-hire fishing effort since 2007 and no growth in for-hire permits.

This is a disappointing vote that will start the process of picking winners and losers in the for-hire fishery, and could set up a “stock market” for permits and a step toward for-hire catch shares. We’ll remain vigilant in fighting against limited entry.

Red snapper and cobia were other big topics discussed last week by the SAFMC and there is some better news.

NOAA Fisheries has gone on record that the SAFMC has taken sufficient action to end overfishing of red snapper, so extreme measures such as closing other snapper-grouper fisheries or imposing more closed fishing areas to protect red snapper are off the table now.

The problem acknowledged at the SAFMC meeting is that current landings and discard data on red snapper are so poor they aren’t sufficient to be able to calculate an Annual Catch Limit, so efforts to have a 2018 season will focus on developing a way to calculate a more accurate catch limit.

Catch data problems and jurisdiction were discussed with the cobia fishery, which is closed to recreational fishermen in federal waters.

The SAFMC requested NOAA Fisheries recalculate the recreational landings estimates for 2015 and 2016 as reported through the Marine Recreational Information Program because of concerns about accuracy, especially off North Carolina and Virginia.

Consideration is being given to transferring cobia management authority to the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, which would allow management flexibility between the states.

A stock assessment of cobia will take place next year.

I hope this information is helpful. We’ll continue to stand up for fishermen and fishing communities.

Tom Swatzel
Executive Director
Council for Sustainable Fishing

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Charter and headboats at risk

The South Atlantic Fishery Management Council will once again consider limiting the number of charter and headboats in the snapper-grouper fishery when it meets next week in Ponte Vedra Beach, FL.

This despite a plunge in for-hire fishing effort, no growth in for-hire permits and overwhelming opposition from fishermen.

To stop this effort to pick winners and losers in the for-hire fishery, one that will set up a “stock market” for permits and could be a first step toward for-hire catch shares, please send comments to the SAFMC today opposing limited entry by clicking here.

Since the 2007 reauthorization of the Magnuson-Stevens Act, which mandated very conservative Annual Catch Limits for all fisheries, for-hire fishing effort in the South Atlantic has plunged by nearly 40 percent from a peak of 306,441 angler trips in 2007 to just 188,114 trips in 2016.

Most recently trips fell by 2.4 percent from 2015 to 2016.

Click here to see the graph.

Additionally, this year there are nine less snapper-grouper for-hire permits from North Carolina through east Florida to Key West, than in 2009.

When the SAFMC last seriously considered for-hire limited entry last December, there were 169 written comments against the proposal and just 3 for it, yet SAFMC members are still pushing it.

One of the comments was from the National Association of Charterboat Operators, which describes the for-hire limited entry disaster in the Gulf of Mexico and states that the program is “working to eliminate for hire vessel owners from the industry.”

Click here for the NACO comments.

It would be one thing if for-hire limited entry was about fishery sustainability, but it’s not.

I urge you to click here today to access the SAFMC online comment form and tell them you’re opposed to for-hire limited entry. These “on the record” comments are crucial. Please make your comments no later than next Monday, June 12th.

Thank you in advance for your efforts!

Tom Swatzel
Executive Director
Council for Sustainable Fishing

P.S. The Council for Sustainable Fishing is a non-profit advocacy group that relies on membership dues to operate. Please help us continue our fight against catch shares and for fishermen and fishing communities by clicking here and joining today. Already a member – please consider a higher membership level to help. Thank You!

Contributions or gifts to the Council for Sustainable Fishing are not tax deductible as charitable contributions. However, they may be tax deductible as ordinary and necessary business expenses.

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Insiders 'triple down' on fishery privatization through catch shares

I’m sure you’ve heard of doubling down: “to become more tenacious, zealous, or resolute in a position or undertaking.”

Have you heard of tripling down?

Tripling down is just what South Atlantic Fishery Management Council Vice Chair Charlie Phillips and SAFMC member Chris Conklin did in an effort to gain private ownership of our snapper-grouper fishery through catch shares.

First, Phillips, Conklin and former SAFMC member Jack Cox, all commercial snapper-grouper fleet owners and dealers, attempted as insiders to get a pilot snapper-grouper catch share program for their boats, through a back-door effort using an Exempted Fishing Permit.

The EFP would have given them exclusive snapper-grouper shares and exempted their boats from any trip limits and seasonal or quota closures.

After the SAFMC received 600 comments against -- 97 percent -- and just 16 for the pilot catch share EFP, Phillips, Conklin and Cox had to withdraw the EFP application at the last minute, just as the March 8th public hearing in Jekyll Island, GA was about to begin.

But incredibly in the face of 97 percent opposition from fishermen they are supposed to represent as SAFMC members, Phillips and Conklin doubled down on their catch shares, vowing to regroup and re-file the EFP application at a later date.

But doubling down wasn’t enough – they had to triple down.

In the very last few minutes of the March 10th SAFMC meeting, when most fishermen had stopped paying attention to the meeting, Phillips and Conklin tripled down with a failed attempt to get a presentation on catch shares from a NOAA catch share guru on the SAFMC’s June meeting agenda to “educate” the fishery council and fishermen on the benefits of catch shares.

Click here for the audio recording of the meeting and fast forward to 2:57:30 to hear this unbelievable effort.

There are no benefits to catch shares unless you become a ‘snapper baron’ like in the Gulf of Mexico red snapper fishery, which appears to be the goal of Phillips and Conklin, contrary to the interests of the fishermen they are supposed to represent.

Catch shares consolidate fishing fleets, unemploying tens of thousands of fishermen, hurt fishing communities, and studies have shown they provide no biological benefit or enhance sustainability to fisheries. Catch shares are about picking economic winners and losers.

We’ll have to remain ever vigilant for this threat to fishermen and fishing communities!

Tom Swatzel
Executive Director
Council for Sustainable Fishing

P.S. The Council for Sustainable Fishing is a non-profit advocacy group that relies on membership dues to operate. Please help us continue our fight against catch shares and for fishermen and fishing communities by clicking here and joining today. Already a member – please consider a higher membership level to help. Thank You!

Contributions or gifts to the Council for Sustainable Fishing are not tax deductible as charitable contributions. However, they may be tax deductible as ordinary and necessary business expenses.

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Catch share threat dead for now

Thanks to you and many others, catch share fishery management in the South Atlantic is dead – at least for now.

Yesterday at the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council public hearing in Jekyll Island, GA it was announced that the pilot snapper-grouper catch share Exempted Fishing Permit application had been withdrawn.

Click here for media coverage.

This back-door attempt to begin the privatization of our fishery resources by insiders, sitting SAFMC members Charlie Phillips and Chris Conklin and former SAFMC member Jack Cox, all commercial snapper-grouper fleet owners and dealers, met overwhelming opposition from fishermen all across the region.

By the time of the well-attended public hearing, there were a total of 616 comments on the catch share EFP through the SAFMC’s online comment form: 600 comments or 97 percent against and just 16 comments or 3 percent for.

The 97 percent stakeholder opposition to the catch share EFP should be no surprise. It’s the exact same percentage of opposition expressed to any form of catch shares by snapper-grouper stakeholders to the SAFMC during input on it’s long-range snapper-grouper Vision management plan – a plan the SAFMC promised would be “stakeholder-driven.”

But incredibly, one thing was made clear during the announcement of the withdrawal – these insiders plan on regrouping, with the help of the radical Environmental Defense Fund, and returning one day with another plan to capture ownership of our fishery through catch shares.

We’ll have to remain vigilant.

With your help we’ve been able to stop catch shares for now, but it’s taken a toll on our financial resources. We’ve spent thousands in unbudgeted money on action-alert mailings to all commercial and for-hire fishery permit holders in the four state region, and on communications and research.

We’ve taken on a well-funded EDF backed catch share effort and won.

Please help us with your financial support by clicking here today and joining at the highest level you can afford. Any amount would be helpful -- use the "other" amount and give $10, $15, $25, $35 or more. Already a member – please consider increasing your membership level.

Thank you in advance for your support!

Tom Swatzel
Executive Director
Council for Sustainable Fishing

P.S. The Council for Sustainable Fishing is a non-profit advocacy group that relies on membership dues to operate. Please help us continue our fight against catch shares and for fishermen and fishing communities by clicking here and joining today. Already a member – please consider a higher membership level to help. Thank You!

Contributions or gifts to the Council for Sustainable Fishing are not tax deductible as charitable contributions. However, they may be tax deductible as ordinary and necessary business expenses.

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SC House resolution opposes catch shares, aimed at SAFMC on pilot catch shares effort

On Tuesday, February 28th a resolution was introduced in the SC House of Representatives to oppose catch shares and efforts to conduct pilot catch share programs.

Our thanks to Reps. Lee Hewitt, Jay Jordan, Alan Clemmons, Richie Yow, Roger Kirby and Phillip Lowe for standing up for fishermen and fishing communities against efforts to privatize our fishery resources with catch shares.

A HOUSE RESOLUTION

TO OPPOSE THE PRIVATIZATION OF SOUTH ATLANTIC FEDERAL FISHERY RESOURCES THROUGH CATCH SHARE MANAGEMENT AND EFFORTS THROUGH EXEMPTED FISHING PERMITS OR OTHER MEANS TO CONDUCT PILOT CATCH SHARE PROGRAMS OR STUDIES.

Whereas, "catch share" is a term for fishery management strategies that allocate a specific portion of the total allowable fishery catch to individuals or other entities, effectively giving private ownership of federal fishery resources to individuals and corporations; and

Whereas, in 2010, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Fisheries adopted a national catch share policy, which states that "NOAA encourages the consideration and adoption of catch shares wherever appropriate in fishery management and ecosystem plans and their amendments, and will support the design, implementation, and monitoring of catch share programs"; and

Whereas, private ownership of federal fishery resources through catch share programs nationally has caused significant consolidation of fishing fleets, reducing access to the resource and causing significant fishing job losses to the detriment of fishing communities and the coastal economy; and

Whereas, a 2013 report by the Center for Investigative Reporting provides estimates that as many as eighteen thousand fishing jobs were lost and three thousand seven hundred vessels were no longer fishing in areas that had catch share programs, with those numbers being likely much higher now; and

Whereas, this year, a WVUE-TV, New Orleans, investigative report into the Gulf of Mexico commercial red snapper fishery catch share program stated that just "fifty businesses and fishermen control eighty-one percent of the commercial red snapper allocation," causing many fishermen to lose access to the fishery or forcing them to pay exorbitant prices to buy or rent red snapper shares so they can remain employed in the fishery; and

Whereas, a 2013 NOAA study of the impacts of catch shares on southern New England fishermen and families found that seventy percent said they were "worse/much worse off" with catch shares; and

Whereas, fishery stakeholders in South Carolina and the South Atlantic are overwhelmingly opposed to catch share programs in federal waters as evidenced by ninety-seven percent of the comments on the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council's long-range snapper-grouper fishery management plan being opposed to any form of catch shares; and

Whereas, studies by the Lenfest Ocean Program and reports by Food and Water Watch and others have shown that catch share programs provide no biological benefit or enhanced sustainability to fisheries; and

Whereas, saltwater fishing is economically very important to South Carolina, with recreational and commercial fishing in 2014 generating $545.4 million and $74.3 million in sales and supporting six thousand two hundred and one thousand four hundred jobs respectively, according to NOAA. Now therefore,

Be it resolved by the House of Representatives:

That members of the House of Representatives, by this resolution, oppose the use of catch share fisheries management in federal waters off South Carolina and in the South Atlantic, and any efforts through exempted fishing permits or other means to conduct pilot catch share programs or studies.

Be it further resolved that a copy of the resolution be forwarded to the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council, NOAA Fisheries and the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.

----XX----

Click here for the bill.

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Using the system

“The very people charged with managing these public marine resources for all Americans are using the system to position themselves to own those resources.”

Those are the words of Center for Sportfishing Policy President Jeff Angers in a just published opinion piece in Sport Fishing Magazine entitled “Gulf Scandal Looms for South Atlantic” about the proposed pilot snapper-grouper catch share program involving sitting South Atlantic Fishery Management Council members that the fishery council will consider in just 10 days on March 9th.

More from the opinion piece:

“The alarming investigative series “Hooked Up” (Fox8/New Orleans) dug deep into the muck of the controversial giveaway of red snapper in the Gulf of Mexico. Now the stage is being set to export this swamp to the South Atlantic…

A group calling itself the South Atlantic Commercial Fishing Collaborative is using the oft-abused federal Exempted Fishing Permit process to request a two-year pilot program to assign private ownership privileges for those six species to up to 25 commercial vessels.

In a brazen display, the South Atlantic Commercial Fishing Collaborative currently consists of four individuals, including two sitting South Atlantic Fishery Management Council members and one former member.”

The “brazen” individuals who Angers states are “using the system” to position themselves to own our snapper-grouper fishery are SAFMC Vice Chair Charlie Phillips, SAFMC member Chris Conklin and former SAFMC member Jack Cox, all commercial snapper-grouper fleet owners and dealers.

This effort would not only give these insiders effective ownership of a significant portion of the snapper-grouper fishery, it would exempt them from all trip limits and all quota and seasonal closures.

There is very little time left to stop this effort to create a catch share scheme like the one in the Gulf of Mexico, where a few ‘snapper barons’ own nearly all of the fishery and the majority of fishermen either become ‘serfs’ having to pay the barons for the right to fish or they become unemployed.

There are just 10 days before the SAFMC will decide whether to support the Exempted Fishing Permit application for this insider pilot catch share program or not.

If you have not already done so, please tell the SAFMC today that you’re opposed to the pilot catch share program permit and any form of catch shares by clicking here and using their online comment form. Just a sentence or two will do.

Please do it today!

Thank you in advance for your efforts. Through a united effort we can save our fisheries from privatization and our fishing jobs.

Tom Swatzel
Executive Director
Council for Sustainable Fishing

P.S. The Council for Sustainable Fishing is a non-profit advocacy group that relies on membership dues to operate. Please help us continue our fight against catch shares and for fishermen and fishing communities by clicking here and joining today. Already a member – please consider a higher membership level to help. Thank You!

Contributions or gifts to the Council for Sustainable Fishing are not tax deductible as charitable contributions. However, they may be tax deductible as ordinary and necessary business expenses.

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Tell the SAFMC NO to catch shares today!

I wanted you to know that the first step toward full privatization of our snapper-grouper fishery is underway.

Last week, South Atlantic Fishery Management Council Vice-Chair Charlie Phillips and SAFMC member Chris Conklin filed their Exempted Fishing Permit application for a pilot commercial snapper-grouper catch share program.

Click here for the application, which only became public on Friday. Note that the phrase “catch shares” is not used in the application as to purpose – instead code-speak for catch shares like “allocation-based system” and “individual transferable quota” is used.

As promised, this EFP gives Phillips, Conklin and former SAFMC member Jack Cox, all commercial snapper-grouper fleet owners and dealers, exclusive snapper-grouper shares and would exempt them from any trip limits and seasonal or quota closures.

EFPs are usually for research purposes and are approved by just one person -- NOAA Fisheries Regional Administrator Dr. Roy Crabtree, who is seeking the advice of the SAFMC at their March meeting in Jekyll Island, GA as to whether the EFP application should move forward or not.

Unless the SAFMC takes a strong stand against the EFP, I believe there is a very good chance Dr. Crabtree will ultimately approve the pilot catch share program. Once in place, count on efforts to impose catch shares on all fishermen.

This back-door “pilot” catch share scheme is exactly what the radical Environmental Defense Fund has used as a tactic in the Gulf of Mexico, where, according to a recent WVUE-TV investigative report “50 businesses and fishermen control 81 percent” of the commercial red snapper catch shares, worth $23 million a year, making these ‘snapper barons’ millionaires.

Guess who’s pushing this back-door effort along with these SAFMC ringleaders? According to the Charleston, SC Post & Courier, it’s EDF front group Seafood Harvesters of America, which according to tax documents has been funded with over $300,000 from EDF.

The Seafood Harvesters represent some of the biggest catch share owners in the nation. Board members include Jack Cox and Buddy Guindon (Big Fish Texas) who, according to media reports, is the third largest owner of Gulf red snapper shares, worth $1.4 million annually.

This isn’t about research -- it’s about picking the economic winners and losers in the snapper-grouper fishery by reducing the number of fishermen -- that’s what catch shares do. They hurt fishermen and fishing communities by killing jobs.

And if you have a for-hire snapper-grouper permit, this could ultimately affect that permit, too. The SAFMC also has on its meeting agenda for-hire limited entry, which is a beginning step toward for-hire catch shares. In other areas of the country, after commercial catch shares were imposed, for-hire catch shares shortly followed.

And this is not about fishery sustainability. Studies by the Lenfest Ocean Program and reports by Food and Water Watch and others have shown that catch share programs provide no biological benefit or enhanced sustainability to fisheries at all.

Time is very short -- speak out today to save jobs and fishing communities! Here’s how:

  1. Click here to access the SAFMC online comment form and tell them you’re opposed to the pilot catch share program permit and any form of catch shares. These “on the record” comments are crucial. Please make comments no later than March 8th.
  2. Speak out against the permit at the SAFMC public hearing on Wednesday, March 8th at 4:30 pm at the Westin Hotel, 110 Ocean Way, Jekyll Island, GA.
  3. Contact your representatives on the SAFMC to personally let them know you oppose the permit. Click here for contact information for all SAFMC members.

The only way to stop this catch share effort is for fishermen, like you, to step up and be heard by the SAFMC. I urge you to let the SAFMC know today that you oppose this back-door catch share effort before it’s too late.

Thank you in advance for your efforts!

Wayne Mershon
President
Council for Sustainable Fishing

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Snapper barons

First came ‘sea lords’ and now ‘snapper barons.’

About a year ago AL.com did an investigative report on the Gulf of Mexico commercial red snapper catch share program in which it called the top share holders ‘sea lords’ and those fishermen who had to pay them for the right to catch red snapper ‘serfs.’

Last week, WVUE-TV in New Orleans did a series of investigative reports on this same catch share program, one of which was entitled “'Snapper barons' raking in riches from public resource.

From the report:

“…50 businesses and fishermen control 81 percent of the commercial red snapper allocation. Those 50 fishermen can make a total of $23 million every year.

The largest shareholder, Russell Underwood of Lynn Haven, Florida, can gross $1.6 million a year.

…The government allows the shareholders to sell their snapper allocation. They can make hundreds of thousands of dollars a year without ever touching the water. They essentially can take what the government gives them for free, sell it to a fisherman, and profit from that transaction.

One Pascagoula, Mississippi shareholder, operating under the business Tampico, can make $604,000 a year without ever dropping a line in the water.”

These reports highlight what catch shares are all about -- creating economic winners and losers, not fishery sustainability, with most fishermen and fishing communities on the losing end.

A 2013 report by the Center for Investigative Reporting provides estimates that as many as 18,000 fishing jobs were lost and 3,700 vessels were no longer fishing in areas that had catch share programs.

I’m sure those numbers are even higher now.

This is why the overwhelming majority of South Atlantic fishermen, commercial and recreational, oppose catch shares, and why it’s so disappointing to see South Atlantic Fishery Management Council members propose a “pilot” commercial snapper-grouper catch share program that will ultimately create ‘snapper barons’ and ‘serfs.’

We’re going to continue to stand up for fishermen and fishing communities as this fight moves forward.

Tom Swatzel
Executive Director
Council for Sustainable Fishing

P.S. The Council for Sustainable Fishing is a non-profit advocacy group that relies on membership dues to operate. Please help us continue our fight for fishermen and fishing communities by clicking here and joining today. Thank You!

Contributions or gifts to the Council for Sustainable Fishing are not tax deductible as charitable contributions. However, they may be tax deductible as ordinary and necessary business expenses.

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Eliminating over 60 percent of fishermen

We need your help today to stop the “pilot” commercial snapper-grouper catch share program being proposed by two South Atlantic Fishery Management Council members: Vice Chair Charlie Phillips and Chris Conklin, both commercial snapper-grouper fleet owners and dealers.

Incredibly, Chris, in a recent email about this pilot program that was publicly posted on a fishing forum, effectively said he wants to get rid of 60 percent of commercial snapper-grouper fishermen, who he calls “part timers,” so the big snapper-grouper players will benefit.

From his email:

“Let's keep in mind that over 60% of these permits are being leased out to part timers that do not rely on commercial snapper grouper fishing as their primary source of income, thus catching a large portion of the quota the full time career fisherman that rely on the fishery to support their families.”

Most full time career commercial and for-hire fishermen in the South Atlantic make a living by participating in multiple fisheries, so they could be considered part timers in many fisheries. But they are full time career fishermen, of which snapper-grouper is just one vital income source.

Imagine eliminating 60 percent of commercial snapper-grouper fishermen and the economic devastation that would inflict on families and fishing communities. That’s what catch shares do.

Click here for the letter we sent to these SAFMC members asking them to stop.

If you haven’t already done so, please contact these SAFMC catch share ringleaders today and tell them to stop trying to put fishermen out of business by pushing unwanted catch shares:

Vice Chair Charlie Phillips -- ga_capt@yahoo.com or 912-832-4423
Chris Conklin -- conklinsafmc@gmail.com or 843-543-3833

Thank you in advance for your efforts!

Tom Swatzel
Executive Director
Council for Sustainable Fishing

P.S. The Council for Sustainable Fishing is a non-profit advocacy group that relies on membership dues to operate. Please help us continue our fight for fishermen and fishing communities by clicking here and joining today. Thank You!

Contributions or gifts to the Council for Sustainable Fishing are not tax deductible as charitable contributions. However, they may be tax deductible as ordinary and necessary business expenses.

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Help stop the catch share threat!

I hope you had a happy new year.

As we enter 2017, the biggest threat to commercial and recreational fishermen in the South Atlantic is back: private ownership of the snapper-grouper fishery through a catch share program.

Fishery stakeholders have year after year overwhelmingly rejected any form of catch shares. Most recently, 97 percent of the comments on the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council’s long-range snapper-grouper management plan opposed catch shares -- a plan the council promised would be “stakeholder-driven.”

Yet, SAFMC Vice Chair Charlie Phillips has revealed that he, SAFMC member Chris Conklin and former SAFMC member Jack Cox, all commercial snapper-grouper fleet owners and dealers, are leading an effort to get a voluntary “pilot” catch share program in place this year using an “Exempted Fishing Permit,” which is a back door way to avoid the normal fishery regulation approval process.

Exempted Fishing Permits are approved solely by NOAA Fisheries Regional Administrator Roy Crabtree, who is also a member of the SAFMC. The SAFMC and the public can only provide input on the application. EFPs are normally used for research purposes when there is a need to get an exemption from fishery regulations.

In this case, the EFP would give participants shares of the fishery and apparently exempt them from any seasonal or quota closures. In a recent article in the Charleston, SC Post & Courier, Vice Chair Phillips touts that the permit would “allow them to catch all year."

The article also reveals that the Seafood Harvesters of America, which has been funded with over $300,000 from the radical Environmental Defense Fund, is supporting the EFP application. The Seafood Harvesters represent some of the biggest catch share owners in the nation.

Click here to read our president Wayne Mershon’s response in the Post & Courier entitled “Don't bite on risky lure of 'catch shares'.”

Wayne documents that catch shares destroy jobs (more than 18,000 so far) and don’t provide any biological benefit to fisheries. Catch shares only pick economic winners (“sea lords”) and losers (“serfs”). There certainly isn’t a need for a pilot catch share program -- all fishermen need to do is look to the catch share disasters in the Gulf of Mexico, New England and Pacific.

It’s not clear when the EFP application would be submitted to NOAA and the SAFMC. However, Vice Chair Phillips is optimistic that his fellow SAFMC members would endorse the EFP, telling the Post & Courier: "I'd like to think the council would say yes. It would be a reasonable thing to do."

Let’s hope not.

Beyond the very serious question of potential conflicts of interests, the SAFMC should honor its promise to fishery stakeholders and oppose this back door effort to privatize the fishery, as should NOAA.

Here’s how you can help:

Contact the SAFMC ringleaders of this effort today and tell them to listen to fishermen as promised and stop pushing unwanted catch shares:
Vice Chair Charlie Phillips -- ga_capt@yahoo.com or 912-832-4423
Chris Conklin -- conklinsafmc@gmail.com or 843-543-3833

Thank you in advance for your efforts!

Tom Swatzel
Executive Director
Council for Sustainable Fishing

P.S. The Council for Sustainable Fishing is a non-profit advocacy group that relies on membership dues to operate. Please help us continue our fight for fishermen and fishing communities by clicking here and joining today. Thank You!

Contributions or gifts to the Council for Sustainable Fishing are not tax deductible as charitable contributions. However, they may be tax deductible as ordinary and necessary business expenses.

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